Philately related rss feeds

  • Recent German Lighthouse Postmarks
    [See image gallery at lighthousestampsociety.org]   [See image gallery at lighthousestampsociety.org]   [See image gallery at lighthousestampsociety.org]   [See image gallery at lighthousestampsociety.org] Read more »
  • 2019 Denmark Lighthouse Stamps
    On 16 May 2019, PostNord Denmark issued a nice set of five lighthouse stamps. Featured are: Hammeren Lighthouse on the Baltic island of Bornholm, Lyngvig Lighthouse on the west coast of Jutland, Hirtshals Lighthouse at Stenbjerg, Taksensand Lighthouse at Fynshav and Langelands (Øre, Omø) Lighthouse located on Omø Island. [See image gallery at lighthousestampsociety.org]   [See image gallery at lighthousestampsociety.org]   [See image gallery at lighthousestampsociety.org]   [See image gallery at lighthousestampsociety.org]   [See image gallery at lighthousestampsociety.org]   Click here to see more lighthouse stamps from Denmark Read more »
  • 2019 Alderney Lighthouse Stamps
    On 30 March 1899, the S.S. Stella struck Les Casquets reef and sank quickly while enroute from Southhamton to Guernsey in dense fog. Many of the 77 passengers and crew perished in the accident. One hundred and twenty years later, on 13 Feb 2019, Alderney issued a set of stamps commemorating this tragedy. The 62p stamp depicts The Needles Lighthouse off the stern of the Stella while the 63p, 94p and souvenir sheet show Les Casquets Lighthouse. [See image gallery at lighthousestampsociety.org]   [See image gallery at lighthousestampsociety.org]   [See… Read more »
  • 2019 Germany Lighthouse Stamp
    On 6 June 2019 Deutschen Post issued a new stamp showing Campen Lighthouse (not to be confused with Kampen Lighthouse). This is a new stamp design and hopefully we will see more in this series. Campen L/H is the tallest in Germany and 14th tallest in the world and houses the most powerful of all lighthouse lamps in Germany. The mechanical building on the site houses a working diesel engine that was built in 1906. The lights shown by Campen are very interesting. There is a very narrow beam that… Read more »
  • 2019 France Lighthouse Stamp
    On 6 May 2019 LaPoste issued a stamp featuring Augustin Fresnel the brilliant French engineer and physicist who contributed so much to the efficiency of the lighthouse. Though he only lived 39 years Fresnel accomplished much in the field of optics and while serving as commissioner of lighthouses he proposed that the lens of his design be used in lighthouses. Fresnel lenses are still found in many lighthouses worldwide nearly 200 years after his death. [See image gallery at lighthousestampsociety.org]   [See image gallery at lighthousestampsociety.org]       See… Read more »
  • 2019 Beautiful Netherlands #5
    The fifth (and final) issue of the 2019 Beautiful Netherlands stamps depicting the lighthouses of the Frisian Islands was issued by PostNL on 20 May 2o19. This one features both the Schiermonnikoog Lighthouse and the Schiermonnikoog South Lighthouse. The south lighthouse has been inactive since 1909 and has served as both a communications tower and a water tower in later years. The active red-painted light was built in 1854 and shows both a flashing white light and steady white or red directional light depending on the direction from which it… Read more »

  • OTD: University of Manitoba opens
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    On today’s date in 1877, the University of Manitoba officially opened its doors to confer degrees on graduates of its three founding colleges. Its founding institutions included St. Boniface College (Roman Catholic and Francophone), St John’s College (Anglican) and Manitoba College (Presbyterian). As Western Canada’s first university, the University of Manitoba offered instruction through these three existing colleges. The university’s administration building (shown above in a photo from 2005) was featured on the 2002 stamp. Today, the school boasts about 21,000 students with 22 faculties across two campuses. It offers… Read more »
  • OTD: Domestic-rate stamp marks B.C.’s 125th anniversary
    On today’s date in 1996, an “evocative” domestic-rate stamp (Scott #1613) was issued by Canada Post to mark the 125th anniversary of British Columbia joining the Canadian Confederation. On July 20, 1871, British Columbia became Canada’s sixth province; however, this outcome was of no certainty throughout the preceding decade, during which time residents of the colony debated joining their U.S. trading partners or upholding colonial power. “A promise by the Dominion Government to complete a transcontinental railway within ten years, however, did much to sway public opinion,” reads a press… Read more »
  • Another new CCO for APS
    This June, only five months after naming Mark Kellner as its new chief content officer (CCO), the American Philatelic Society (APS) announced Thomas Loebig would be taking over that role immediately. The APS CCO serves as editor of two award-winning journals, The American Philatelist and the Philatelic Literature Review, the latter of which is the flagship publication of the American Philatelic Research Library. The CCO is also responsible for leading the growth of digital content offered to members and non-members through the APS website, stamps.org. “Tom brings experienced leadership in the digital… Read more »
  • OTD: Cunard’s first steamer reaches Halifax
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    On today’s date in 1840, Samuel Cunard arrived in Halifax, N.S. on his first steamship, a paddle steamer known as Britannia. The RMS Britannia was the first flagship of the British North America Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, which was later known as the Cunard Line. She left Liverpool, England on her maiden voyage on July 4, 1840. 2004 CUNARD STAMP In 2004, Canada Post featured Cunard alongside fellow shipping magnate Sir Hugh Allan on a se-tenant pair of 49-cent commemorative stamps (Scott #2042a) honouring the duo who introduced a trans-Atlantic mail service… Read more »
  • OTD: British Crown grants land to Loyalists
    On today’s date in 1783, the British Crown issued instructions for granting lands to U.S. Loyalists. The Loyalists, who were supportive of Britain during the American Revolution, immigrated to British North America. As per the July 16, 1783 announcement, all heads of families would receive 100 acres of land; members of families would receive 50 acres each; single men would receive 50 acres each; and non-commissioned officers would receive 200 acres. Five years later, in November 1789, Governor Guy Carleton passed an order-in-council expanding the land grant, which gave every… Read more »
  • OTD: Canada’s first communications satellite retires
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    On today’s date in 1982, Canada’s first domestic communications satellite, the “Anik A1,” was retired after 10 years in service. The Anik satellites are a series of geostationary communications satellites launched by Telesat Canada between 1972 and 2013. Some of the later satellites in the series remain operational while others – like the Anik A1 – have since retired. The series’ name was chosen in a national contest won by Julie-Frances Czapla, of St. Leonard, Qué. In Inuktitut, Anik means “little brother.” The Anik A1 was launched from Cape Canaveral,… Read more »
  • OTD: International Peace Garden opens on Canada-U.S. border
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    On today’s date in 1932, the International Peace Garden was established on the Canada-U.S. border near Morton, Man., as a symbol of peace between the two nations. Dr. Henry J. Moore conceived the idea for gardens, “where the people of the two countries could share the glories found in a garden and the pleasures found in warm friendships,” in 1929. The National Association of Gardeners approved the plan, and the nearly 10-square-kilometre park – located on the international border between Manitoba and Rolette County, N.D. – was eventually dedicated during… Read more »
  • OTD: Geddy Lee sings Canadian anthem before 64th midsummer classic
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    On today’s date in 1993, Canadian musician Geddy Lee sang O Canada at Baltimore’s Camden Yards before the opening of the Major League Baseball (MLB) All-Star Game at Oriole Park. Lee, who’s best known for being the bassist and lead vocalist of Rush, sang the Canadian anthem before U.S. actor James Earl Jones recited his country’s anthem accompanied by the Morgan State University choir. After the ceremony, fireworks exploded over Fort McHenry while airplanes from Andrews Air Force Base flew over Camden Yards. The American League (AL) eventually defeated the National… Read more »
  • With few volunteers, hosting a Royal a formidable challenge
    By Jesse Robitaille Sitting alongside organizers throughout the three-day Royal Convention – four days, if you include setup on Thursday, and with about a year of planning beforehand – I realize exactly how much work goes on behind the scenes. This year’s Royal was co-hosted by us here at CSN, as well as the Bramalea Stamp Club (BSC) and West Toronto Stamp Club (WTSC), with a core group of seven organizers behind the wheel: BSC member Joe Trauzzi chaired the organizing committee; his wife, Wendi, organized all the banquets; CSN… Read more »
  • Alleged forgers pillage millions from British postal service
    An Italian father and son are being charged with forging 3.6 million first-class stamps from Britain’s Royal Mail with a total value exceeding £2.2 million (about $3.6 million Cdn.). Ciro Gallo, 46, and his son Ivan, 20, are accused of organizing the fraud for five years – from 2013 until last November – although they deny all charges and have been granted unconditional bail. Prosecutors believe the younger Gallo is responsible for forging the stamps, which were then used by his father. The son faces three charges of using a… Read more »

  • James Hay Upcher
    James Hay Upcher 1854-1931 James Hay Upcher (7 January 1854 – 17 March 1931) was Archdeacon of Mashonaland from 1925 until his death. Upcher was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge was ordained deacon in 1877 and Priest in 1878. After curacies in Halesworth, Sudbourne, Barnham Broom and Bury St Edmunds he held incumbencies at Sprowston, and Sculthorpe. In July 1892, Upcher arrived in Pretoria with Alfred Dykes Sylvester and travelled up to Rhodesia. Sylvester went to Fort Victoria while Read more »
  • Real Photo Postcards – Type XIII – J M Mein
    Real Photo Postcards Type XIII – J M Mein Read more »
  • Union-Castle Line 1900 to 1977 – George Stewart
    Union-Castle Line 1900 to 1977 George Stewart Download Union-Castle Line 1900 to 1977 (pdf) Read more »
  • Cinderellas: RAPT – 1981 Butterflies of Southern Africa
    Rehabilitation and Prevention of Tuberculosis (RAPT) 1981 Butterflies of Southern Africa Details Date of Issue: 1981 Designer:  Printer: Mardon Printers Process: Paper: Perf: Comb 14 Sheet: 10 x 5 Booklet: Quantity: ½ pane (25) Price: 50c Commercial Covers FB Read more »
  • Cinderellas: RAPT – 1989 Butterflies and Flowers of Zimbabwe
    Rehabilitation and Prevention of Tuberculosis (RAPT) 1989 Butterflies and Flowers of Zimbabwe Details Date of Issue: 1988 Designer: Rob Jeffrey Printer: Mardon Printers Process: Paper: Perf: Sheet: 5 x 5 Booklet: 1 pane of 25 Quantity: Price: $1.00 FB Read more »
  • Cinderellas: RAPT – 1988 Some Endangered Species of Zimbabwe
    Rehabilitation and Prevention of Tuberculosis (RAPT) 1988 Some Endangered Species of Zimbabwe Details Date of Issue: 1988 Designer: Nancy Abrey Printer: Mardon Printers Process: Paper: Perf: Comb 14 Sheet: 5 x 5 Booklet: 1 pane of 25 Quantity: Price: $1.00 FB Read more »
  • Buluwayo Board of Executors & Trust Co Ltd
    Buluwayo Board of Executors & Trust Co Ltd Bulawayo The Buluwayo Board of Executors & Trust Co Ltd was one of the oldest businesses in Rhodesia, being established c.1894. Contributors James Gavin FB Read more »
  • Events: 1910-1919
    1919 1918 1917 1916 1915 1914 1913 1912 1911 1910 1910.10.31 – Royal Visit of the Duke and Duchess of Connaught Read more »
  • 1910 – Royal Visit of the Duke and Duchess of Connaught
    Royal Visit of the Duke and Duchess of Connaught 31 October – 26 December, 1910 In 1910, the Duke Arthur William Patrick Albert and Duchess Louise Margaret of Connaught began a royal tour of Africa, accompanied by Princess Patricia. The Royal couple represented King George V due to his recent ascension to the throne on the death of King Edward Read more »
  • 1910 – Double Heads
    British South Africa Company 1910 – Double Heads Details Date of Issue: 11th November, 1910 Date Withdrawn: Date Invalidated: Designer:  Printer: Waterlow & Sons Ltd Process: Recess Paper: Watermark: N/A Perf: 14 Cylinders: Sheet: Booklet: N/A Quantity: Production Details Pre-Production Production Presentation FB Read more »

  • Post Offices of Great Britain: Knaresborough (2017)
    Here's a fine photograph of Knaresborough Post Office in the United Kingdom taken by photographer Richard Turton. Knaresborough /nɛərzbrə, -bərə/ is an historic market town, spa town and civil parish in the Borough of Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, it is located on the River Nidd, 4 miles Read more »
  • Nicaragua: the First Airmail Stamps
    Reading Time: 2 minutes Apart from the early overprints in 1929, the first airmail stamp design for Nicaragua was the well known ‘aeroplanes flying over the volcano of Momotombo’. Read more »
  • Map of Persia and Afghanistan (Gall and Inglis 1871)
  • First Among Tasmanians: The Story of a 1907 Cover
    Reading Time: 4 minutes For the past 1½ years this cover has been lying fallow, for research was unproductive, then the floodgates opened over a period of 1 hour. Read more »
  • Zeppelin Stamps: German Gasbags
    Enjoying a glamorous if relatively short career, Zeppelin airships captured the imagination of the public and were consequently a popular subject for cinderellas. Poster stamps were produced for aviation and military enthusiasts, as World War I propaganda and even to advertise biscuits! The stamps illustrated here are just a small selection of those which can Read more »
  • Map showing Locations of St. Helena and Ascension in Atlantic
    This map shows the locations of both St. Helena and Ascension Island in the South Atlantic. Both these islands have strong philatelic followings... Read more »
  • Stamps of the Falkland Islands: 90th Anniversary of the Camber Railway (2005)
    The Camber railway was a single line of 24-inch gauge approximately 3½ miles in length and was built during 1915 and 1916. It remained in use until the late 1920s. The railway was required when in World War One the Admiralty installed a new communications system, a powerful spark transmitter with an array of high Read more »
  • The ‘Gray’ Kangaroos, of Course!
    A collection of mostly mint Kangaroos does not readily fit the profile of a column largely devoted to stamp usage on cover. However, not to feature the remarkable collection of Kangaroos formed by Arthur Gray, which was auctioned by Shreves Philatelic Galleries in New York on 22-23 February, would be to guarantee readership of the Read more »

  • International Zone of Tangier, British Offices (1924 – 1956)
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    ALBUM – International Zone of Tangier, British Offices Summary The International Zone of Tangier, located on the northwest coast of Morocco, was administered by a committee of foreign powers from 1924 – 1956. When Spain and France divided Morocco for colonization in 1912, Tangier remained a disputed area, primarily because of it’s strategic location at the mouth of the Mediterranean Sea. As a result, it was decided that Tangier would become an International Zone. The agreement was put on hold due to World War I, and wasn’t finalized until Dec… Read more »
  • DCStamps Investigator – Overprint Madness #4
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    Issue #7 Apr 11, 2018 Michael Adkins Welcome to Issue 7 of the DCStamps Investigator. If you are a regular reader, you might have noticed that it has been issued at a slower pace than anticipated. This is primarily because I am diligently working in the background to improve DCStamps.  It is a large task, as it involves updating and modernizing all of the more than 130 articles and 200 albums posted on the site. Plus, I am working on several new transition charts for areas such as Morocco/Western Sahara… Read more »
  • DCStamps Investigator – Overprint Madness #3
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    Issue #6 Mar 14, 2018 Michael Adkins In the last issue of the DCStamps Investigator, we discussed overprints using initials. In this edition, we continue our exploration by looking at emblems and symbols. Symbols Overprinted on Dead Country Stamps National symbols and emblems are important for building or emphasizing a common identity. Therefore, it is no surprise that nations trying to change (or even create) its identity often used an image, rather than a name. In this edition, we will explore six “countries” which used emblems on their overprints for… Read more »
  • Luxembourg, German Occupation ww2 (1940 – 1944)
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    ALBUM – German Occupation of Luxembourg in WW2 Summary The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg is a small country bordering Belgium, France and Germany. In May/June, 1940, Nazi Germany invaded western Europe, taking Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, and much of France. Under occupation, the Nazis began a program of forced “germanization,” considering the Luxembourgers to be ethnic Germans. Eventually the people of Luxembourg were made German citizens on Jan 1, 1942 when the Duchy was fully annexed into Germany. The Occupation was harsh as the Jews were expelled or taken to… Read more »
  • DCStamps Investigator – Overprint Madness #2 — Dead Country Stamps and Banknotes
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    Issue #5 Feb 23, 2018 Michael Adkins In this issue of the DCStamps Investigator, we continue our series on the world of overprints on stamps, especially as it relates to dead counties. Someone asked me why I used the term “Madness” in the title. From what I’ve covered so far, I can understand the discontinuity.… via DCStamps Investigator – Overprint Madness #2 — Dead Country Stamps and Banknotes The post DCStamps Investigator – Overprint Madness #2 — Dead Country Stamps and Banknotes appeared first on Dead Country Stamps and Banknotes. Read more »
  • DCStamps Investigator – Overprint Madness #2
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    Issue #5 Feb 23, 2018 Michael Adkins In this issue of the DCStamps Investigator, we continue our series on the world of overprints on stamps, especially as it relates to dead counties. Someone asked me why I used the term “Madness” in the title. From what I’ve covered so far, I can understand the discontinuity. But as we delve deeper into the subject, we will discover that overprints become much more complicated. This is especially true to those newer to worldwide collecting. In the coming weeks we will be discussing… Read more »
  • Lorraine, German Occupation in WW2 (1940-1944)
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    ALBUM – German Occupation of Lorraine in WW2 Summary Lorraine (Lothringen) is an area in eastern France on the German border. The rich agricultural and industrial region changed hands between France and Germany several times over the last few centuries. In May/June, 1940, early in World War 2, Nazi Germany invaded western Europe, taking Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, and much of France, including Lorraine. The Germans annexed Lorraine along with Alsace and occupied the region until the Allies liberated the region including it’s major city Metz on Dec 13, 1944.… Read more »
  • DCStamps Investigator – Overprint Madness #1
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    Issue #4 Feb 13, 2018 Michael Adkins When I began collecting dead country stamps, I thought that I would only include “countries” that printed at least one non-overprinted, unique stamp. However, I changed my mind when I realized that a significant number of dead countries only issued overprinted stamps, especially those short lived ones. Overprints are defined as additional markings applied to the face of a stamp after it has been printed. These markings can either be applied by a printing press or hand-stamped. When the marking indicates a change… Read more »
  • DCStamps Investigator – What Makes a Country “Dead”
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    Issue #3 Jan 27, 2018 Michael Adkins This week I continue the discussion about the definition of a “dead country.” In Issue #2 of the DCStamps Investigator, I provided my “very loose” definition of a country: “Any governmental, political, colonial, military or revolutionary entity which had control (or legitimately attempted to have control) over a region of land and it’s people.” This week we move to the second part of the definition – what makes it “dead.” What Makes a Country Dead? For a country to cease to exist, one… Read more »
  • Alsace, German Occupation in WW2 (1940 – 1944)
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    ALBUM – German Occupation of Alsace in WW2 Summary Alsace (Elsaß) is an area in eastern France on the German border. The rich agricultural and industrial region changed hands between France and Germany several times over the last few centuries. In May/June, 1940, early in World War 2, Nazi Germany invaded western Europe, taking Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, and much of France, including Alsace. The Germans annexed Alsace and occupied the region until the Allies liberated Strasbourg on Nov 23, 1944. Fast Facts Region: Western Europe Group: German Occupations Classification:… Read more »

  • Portugal Orders Khadi For Gandhi Stamps
    To bring out a “commemorative khadi stamp on Mahatma Gandhi” on his 150th birth anniversary on October 2, Portugal has ordered the signature fabric of India, the Khadi and Village Industries Commission (KVIC), said on July 5. After the successful … Continue reading → Read more »
  • France will Issue Stamp on 75th Anniversary of Liberation of Paris
    During World War II, Germany invaded Paris on June 14, 1940. A little more than four years later, on Aug. 25, 1944, the French 2nd Armored Division and the United States 4th Infantry Division liberated the city.Date of Issue:25th August … Continue reading → Read more »
  • USPS:Country Fairs Stamp Issue
    The colorful se-tenant stamps — one scene across four stamps —celebrate the fun of America’s state and county fairs. The stamp on the far left shows farmers unloading produce behind a white fence. In the second stamp, a child holding … Continue reading → Read more »
  • Isle of Man Issued Stamps on Manx Language
    Featuring six designs, they portray “a day in the life of two Manx mice” with a variety of Gaelic greetings.Culture Vannin’s Jamys O’Meara, who provided the text, said the organisation was “delighted” to be involved in the project.The collection comes … Continue reading → Read more »
  • Special Cover Released on “Say No to Plastic”
    Date of Release:4th July 2019,Chandigarh Read more »
  • Malaysia Issued Marvel Stamps
    Malaysia released a whole set on 4th July 2019 that comprises three stamp sheets with 11 stamps, two souvenir covers, two post cards and one folder–all of which feature awesome art straight out of the comics. The stamps features Marvel … Continue reading → Read more »
  • USPS Issued Forever Stamps on Frogs
    The Morrison Knudsen Nature Center hosted a national celebration and dedication of four new Frog Forever Stamps on 9th July 2019.Idaho Department Fish and Game representatives, government officials and frog experts joined the U.S. Postal Service at the ceremony. Two … Continue reading → Read more »
  • Special Cover Released on Doctors Day
    Date of Release: 1st July 2019,Chandramauli Nagar,Guntur,Andhra Pradesh Read more »
  • New Stamps from Niue,Tokelau and NewZealand
    Niue : 50 Years of Moon Landing On Tuesday 2 July 2019, the Moon – Mahina – will block the sun over the South Pacific Ocean, Chile and Argentina for a partial solar eclipse, and Niue will be one of … Continue reading → Read more »
  • Record keeping of Stamps with Technological Advancements
    By Dinabandhu Mahapatra Every philatelist believes that each published/ issued stamp carries a part of history, culture, civilization, development  etc. (all together or any combination thereof) of issuing country as well as any other country depicted.Hence, in my limited knowledge  the … Continue reading → Read more »

  • Say “Cheese”
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    In 2015 Poland Post issued a postage stamp featuring a particular regional product of the country – cheese. The stamp above has a Korycinski cheese, named after the town of Korycin in Poland. It is thought to be the oldest polish ‘yellow’ cheese. On the 2017 Bosnia and Herzegovina stamp below is Travnik cheese, which boasts a long tradition, produced exclusively in the region of Mount Vlasic. It is produced using local-breed sheep (Pramenka) and cow (Busa) milk, and the rennet is made according to a secret recipe. In 2011 Italy… Read more »
  • History of Stamp Collecting Part 33 – A Robbery in 1865
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    In the late 1970s a fascinating series of articles written by Mr. K. Kouwenberg about the history of Stamp Collecting, appeared in the Dutch magazine Philatelie. This series has been the source of inspiration for PostBeeld owner Rob Smit to rewrite the history of stamp collecting in instalments. This is Part 33 In The Stamp Collector’s Magazine 1865, on page 28 the following article can be seen: “On February 4, 1865, Alexander Dodd, 15 years old, appeared in court in Liverpool. He is accused of stealing £500-worth of stamps from… Read more »
  • If You Can’t Stand the Heat ………….
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    Climate change, global warming and environmental Issues are, quite rightly, often in the news. I, for one, am more than pleased with the great focus on these subjects nowadays although there are many influential people and organisations that, despite scientific evidence, continue to deny the facts. I have experienced the terrible winter fogs of 1950s London caused by the effects of widespread coal burning, vehicle emissions and other pollutants which killed thousands and hospitalised hundreds of thousands of people. This experience left me with life-long lung problems. So, as I… Read more »
  • Europa National Birds Stamps 2019
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    The subject for 2019’s Europa stamps is National Birds. Spain has a bearded vulture on its 2019 six-stamp Premium Sheet. The bird is adapted to live in the harsh high landscape of the Pyrenean mountain range from Navarre to Catalonia. Its anatomy is unmistakable. This huge bird can reach wingspans of up to 2.80 metres. Its Spanish name, “quebrantahuesos” (bone-breaker) comes from its way of feeding. Among other things it feeds on bones which it drops from a height onto rocks to crack them into smaller pieces. It does this… Read more »
  • Take Me to the Water
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    According to calculations made by an international team of scientists there are 307 million lakes in the world. That number includes all natural lakes, but not human-made lakes such as reservoirs formed by dams. Most lakes on earth are small, with nine out of ten lakes covering less than one hectare (2.5 acres). The world’s largest lake is the Caspian Sea, which extends over 378,119 square kilometres (145,993 square miles), an area about the size of the American state of Montana or Germany. No other lake is larger than 100,000… Read more »
  • Tractors
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    The tractor was a very important invention for the development of agricultural production throughout the world and tractors on postage stamps can be an interesting topic for the stamp collector. Maybe some of the following shown here will be of interest also. The stamp above depicts Demeter, the ancient Greek goddess of the harvest, as an allegorical figure representing agriculture, looking down upon tractors ploughing a field, engraved and printed by Thomas De La Rue & Co. Ltd., and issued by Greece in 1951 as one of a set of… Read more »
  • History of Stamp Collecting Part 32 – Collectors’ Associations
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    In the late 1970s a fascinating series of articles written by Mr. K. Kouwenberg about the history of Stamp Collecting, appeared in the Dutch magazine Philatelie. This series has been the source of inspiration for PostBeeld owner Rob Smit to rewrite the history of stamp collecting in instalments. This is Part 32 – Collectors’ Associations. As mentioned in the Part 31, it was not easy to set up an association of stamp collectors. Yet the need remained for an outlet for philatelists to come together to exchange their views and… Read more »
  • British Greetings Stamps with Assay Marks
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    This article appears courtesy of Cees Janssen, a confessed Anglophile and one of the main contributors for PostBeeld’s Dutch-language “Postzegelblog”: After the flood of stamp issues around the Millennium, I chose to limit myself to the stamps of Great Britain printed by Joh. Enschedé Stamps BV in Haarlem, The Netherlands – a small, thematically appealing series. And I was immediately surprised in 2001 with the issue of the greetings stamps. On five stamps the design agency “Springpoint Limited” displayed words in the form of quality (assay) marks or markings that… Read more »
  • Hanse Across the Sea
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    The Hanseatic League, or Hanse, was formed as a northern European trading organisation, founded in the middle of the twelfth century in the north German city of Lubeck and continued as a powerful force for around 500 years. It grew to comprise a network of around 200 trading cities as far apart as London, England, in the west and Viliky Novgorod, Russia, in the east and during its lifetime had to protect its interests from interfering rulers, pirates and rival traders. The type of ship on the stamp above issued… Read more »
  • Mr. Bean – No, not that one! – Continued
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    Coffee is second only to oil as the most-traded commodity in the world.   As mentioned in the previous article, Brazil is the largest coffee producer in the world. Coffee is also an important agricultural product for the economy of many Central and South American countries and various islands in the Caribbean. The Costa Rica definitive stamp set below includes three values – the 45 and 80 Centimos and 10 Colones – showing a female coffee bean picker. Guatemala was Central America’s top producer of coffee for most of the 20th… Read more »

  • Postcard with Mixed Franking 1910 Issue and 1911 Surcharge/Overprint
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    Postcards with mixed franking from this period are really hard to find.Some time ago I was lucky enough to find an amazing postcard with mixed franking from the 1910 issue, one surcharge and one overprint from 1911.It’s very common to find postcards with either stamps from the 1910 issue or with 1911 overprints. However, postcards with 1911 surcharges or mixed franking are very elusive.In this case, I’m talking about a postcard sent from San Jose to Milan, Italy on November 23rd, 1911. It has a hand stamp that reads via… Read more »
  • Costa Rica Stamps: Air Mail Surcharges With Fallen Bar
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    Errors are a consistent part of surcharges and overprints in Costa Rica’s philately. Fallen bars being an interesting variation. Keep on reading to find more about the airmail surcharges with fallen bars.As a consequence of a lack of 15 cent stamps, on June 1st, 1947, the government approved the surcharge (in black and red) of the values from the 1945-6 presidents issue. The surcharge is quite simple. It reads ₡0.15 over the original stamp value.As in most Costa Rican surcharges and overprints, there are errors.For this issue, we can say… Read more »
  • Tips For Stamp Collecting In The XXI Century
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    Unlike what many people believe, technology has come to help philately and here are our tips for stamp collecting in the XXI century.The intention of sharing these tips for stamp collecting in the 21st century is to help make this hobby even more entertaining and at the same time take it to an even higher level of specialization.One of the advantages – and disadvantages at the same time – that philately has as a hobby is that it has been in existence for more than 150 years and for most… Read more »
  • Costa Rica Stamps: Unique Jesús Jiménez Issue Usage To Algeria
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    During the 1920’s is very rare to find Costa Rica stamps used in correspondence to Africa.Recently came to my hands one of those extremely rare piece of Costa Rica stamps’ postal history from the 1920’s.A beautiful postcard depicting passengers getting into a train to depart from Limón to San José. That’s nice, but there’s a rarer factor to it. It has a 2 céntimos Jesús Jiménez stamp and was sent to Algeria!Let’s begin explaining it one detail at a time:The Jesús Jiménez issue circulated for only 6 months. It was… Read more »
  • Download CRRPS’s Philatelic Magazine Timbre For Free
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    Download CRRPS’s philatelic magazine Timbre Vol. 37 for free. Edited by Alvaro Castro (most articles are in Spanish), this issue contains great articles:Colecciones aceptadas para Thailandia 2018 (Accepted Collections For Thailand 2018).Próximas Exposiciones (Future Expositions).El Pez Vela de 1937 (1937’s Sailfish).Vuelos desde Honduras y hacia ella (Flights from and to Honduras)Belice: Un paraíso escondido (Belize A Hidden Paradise)La Producción y las Marcas de Agua en la Prefilatelia Centroamericana – II Parte (Production And Watermars In Central American Pre-Philately II Part).PANAMA: Butterfly Country And Butterfly City.Butterfly – MariposaMophila Report La Gran… Read more »

  • 1913 Hunting & Fishing Licenses in Historical Context – Part Three
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    In todays’ conclusion to our series on the hunting and fishing licenses that were issued during 1913, we shall take a look at many examples issued during the fall hunting seasons – including the first resident hunting licenses for Ohio and Pennsylvania. As we work through the fall months, we shall continue building our historical frame of reference and see a lot of great pieces from the golden era of pre-stamp licensing, so enjoy!   September 1  French aviator and flight instructor Adolphe Pegoud (see Figure 1) became the first… Read more »
  • 1913 Hunting & Fishing Licenses in Historical Context – Part Two
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    In today’s post we will continue to look at hunting and fishing licenses from the year 1913 and their historical context. In the preface to Part One, I explained that one of my reasons for picking 1913 was that five different states issued their first resident hunting license in this year. We will be seeing examples of three of those today – Arkansas, Arizona and Delaware.   Preface Before we start, I feel it necessary to briefly go back “Inside the box” and discuss the Arizona situation. I have always… Read more »
  • 1913 Hunting & Fishing Licenses in Historical Context – Part One
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    I have decided to try something new today and am looking forward to your feedback. This was a challenging project from an organizational standpoint, however, I feel there may be a considerable upside here and, if readers agree, I am willing to produce similar narratives in the future. This post will focus attention on pre-stamp hunting and fishing licenses. This is a fascinating area of our hobby that can be overlooked by those who view it simply as “collateral” to the fish and game stamps, themselves. It seems, to some… Read more »
  • The Peabody Ducks: Behind the Elevator Doors
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    The city of Memphis, the Peabody Hotel and the Peabody Ducks all have a wonderful relationship with our stamp collecting hobby. In 1992 Ducks Unlimited, the largest wetland and waterfowl conservation organization in the world and a major supporter of the Federal Duck Stamp Program, moved their headquarters to Memphis. In 1997 the famous Peabody Ducks were flown to Washington, D.C. and they marched around the Department of Interior auditorium during the opening ceremonies of the federal duck stamp contest. They were a huge hit and made an encore in… Read more »
  • Welcome to Gallery Ten – Part Two
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    As the introductory post for Gallery Ten ended up being rather lengthy and included a large number of high resolution scans, we decided it would be best divided into two parts to facilitate loading on your device. In part two, we shall provide background information and discuss the stamps and licenses found in the remaining (four) individual galleries. For the sake of those who are directed to this page from internet searches, we will repeat some of our website basics in the next few paragraphs. First, you can reach the new… Read more »
  • Welcome to Gallery Ten – Part One
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    We would like to let everyone know that Gallery Ten is now up. Highlighted by 50 different early hunting and fishing licenses issued by New Mexico, starting with their first Hunter’s License as a territory in 1909 and continuing through the end of World War Two (see Figure 1), it can be reached by clicking on Galleries beneath the Home page banner, then clicking on “Gallery Ten”.     Figure 1. 1938-39 New Mexico $5.00 (Resident General Hunting and Fishing) License with RW5 affixed.     Once there, you will find… Read more »
  • The Nebraska Pheasant & Quail Stamps – Part Two
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    In Part One, we saw that Nebraska first required resident and non resident hunters to purchase a license to hunt or fish in 1901. For the first ten years, residents were not required to obtain a license unless hunting outside the county in which they lived. Starting in 1911, that law was tightened up so that residents had to obtain a license when hunting outside of their own property. Nebraska licenses that were issued through 1911 were non pictorial. Then, after an official from the California Department of Fish and… Read more »
  • The Nebraska Pheasant & Quail Stamps – Part One
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    Many of you have contacted us to say how much you enjoyed the recent two-part blog Alex and Jean Case and the Decision at Cafe Ole. We very much appreciate your continued support and are attentive to your feedback. As several comments expressed an interest in learning more about the Nebraska Pheasant and Quail Stamp shown in part two, that will be the subject of our next blogs.   Introduction The first game law in Nebraska was enacted in 1860, just one year before the first game law was enacted… Read more »
  • Alex and Jean Case and the Decision at Cafe Ole – Part Two
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    In the last post we reviewed the Marion County stamp story and I introduced you to Alex Case and his family. It was June of 1993 and my article in The American Revenuer had just come out. Kay and I were visiting her mother in Stacy, Minnesota – located about 40 miles north of Minneapolis. Her mom lived in a house on one of Minnesota’s many (10,000?) beautiful lakes, Martin Lake. It started out as a low-key, relaxing vacation; spending time with Kay’s family and friends, taking lots of long… Read more »
  • Alex and Jean Case and the Decision at Cafe Ole – Part One
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    In today’s post I will begin to tell you about a fun little side trip that Kay and I took while visiting her family in Minnesota during the summer of 1993 – and it’s unexpected benefits. This time in my life was particularly noteworthy as my early travels to Marion County, Kansas and the many years of research and study spent on their fascinating story and philatelic accomplishments had just recently culminated in an article titled The Fish and Game Stamps of Marion County, Kansas. This article was originally published… Read more »


  • Gerrman Austria 1919, the rump state no one wanted
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    Austria paid dearly for involvement in World War I. Given that the war started with the assassination of an Austrian Royal and the last Emperor Karl had offered an early, gentlemanly end to the war for which he was Sainted, this was quite harsh. Yet here we have an early stamp from the treaty created rump state based on ethnicicity. Notice the German identity popping up, hmmm…. So slip on your smoking jacket, fill your pipe, take your first sip of your adult beverage, and sit back in your most… Read more »
  • Haiti 1904, The angels revere an old man who proclaims himself President for life
    Haiti has forever been one of the poorest places on earth. What to make then  of an 84 year old President surrounded by white angels. Don’t worry, heaven wasn’t his destination, New Orleans was. So slip on your smoking jacket, fill your pipe, take your first sip of your adult beverage, and sit back in your most comfortable chair. Welcome to todays offering from The Philatelist. Haiti’s older stamps were usually printed by the American Bank Note Company in New York City. These were as well. It is a safe… Read more »
  • India 1957, is this girl really reading?
    In the 20th century the population of India was rising fast. With it was the demand for education and the need to extend that opportunity to the half that were female. This stamp shows an Indian girl happily reading but it is easier to print a stamp than it is to educate a country. So slip on your smoking jacket, fill your pipe, take your first sip of your adult beverage and sit back in your most comfortable chair. Welcome to todays offering from The Philatelist. A stamp from a… Read more »
  • Iraq 1932, King Faisal brought down by arsenic and old Chaim
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    A young adventurer wants an Empire for himself not just to expand the empire of his father. To get it he double and triple deals with Ottomans, British, and Jews. Awarded an empire in Iraq, where he was a stranger, could the adventurer become a statesman? So slip on your smoking jacket, fill your pipe, take your first sip of your adult beverage, and sit back in your most comfortable chair. Welcome to todays offering from The Philatelist. Todays stamp show the period after Iraq became a self governing Kingdom.… Read more »
  • Great Britain 1982, Showing Austin success Past, Present, and it turns out final
    The industrial revolution did much to bring the masses of people out of poverty. Better off, they can themselves buy more goods expanding the market continuing the cycle. Until the manufacturer has to start cutting prices to keep sales going. Then those factory workers start to look expensive. So slip on your smoking jacket, fill your pipe, take your first sip of your adult beverage, and sit back in your most comfortable chair. Welcome to todays offering from The Philatelist. Britain was trying to put a good face on car… Read more »
  • Montenegro 1898, Prince-Bishop Nicholas trades pan Slavism and religion for war mongering and exile
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    19th century Balkans featured mainly German Kings arguing with their cousins over the spoils from the falling back into Asia Ottomans. What if an Orthodox, Slav King from Montenegro with a flair for soldiery was empowered. Would the Slav people fall behind him. So slip on your smoking jacket, fill your pipe, take your first sip of your adult beverage, and sit back in your most comfortable chair. Welcome to todays offering from The Philatelist. With “Game of Thrones” now over, perhaps an enterprising Montenegrin could concoct a replacement based… Read more »
  • French Kwangchowan 1937, without good governance, France’s Hong Kong becomes a smugglers den
    Hong Kong was such an inspiration to China. With British good governance, the Chinese had achieved so much beyond what any Chinese government achieved. Yet the nearby French leased territory showed living under an European colonial administration was no panacea. So slip on your smoking jacket, fill your pipe, take your first sip of your adult beverage, and sit back in your most comfortable chair. Welcome to todays offering by The Philatelist. Kwangchowan was an area of Guandong province in China leased for 99 years to France beginning in 1898.… Read more »
  • Mexico 1968, putting a modern face forward for the modern Olympics
    Getting the Olympics to come to Mexico was a big deal. Mexico was determined to show itself a modern country, with an indigenous culture but a part of the modern  world. Well sometimes the modern world brings with it some baggage. So slip on your smoking jacket, fill your pipe, take your first sip of your adult beverage, and sit back in your most comfortable chair. Welcome to todays offering from The Philatelist. Mexico’s many stamp issues leading up to the games feature artwork by famed muralist Diego Rivera. His… Read more »
  • Italian Eritrea 1930, Pouring it on for Italy’s first daughter colony
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    Eritrea sat on the African side of the Red Sea. It’s importance to Europeans grew with the completion of the Suez Canal. It was already important to Arab traders. If it could be peeled away from Ethiopia what a great first colony for a newly united Italy. So slip on your smoking jacket, fill your pipe, take your first sip of your adult beverage, and sit back in your most comfortable chair. Welcome to todays offering from The Philatelist. The Italian cavalryman cuts an impressive figure on the stamp. It… Read more »
  • Spain 1983, the now left government tries and fails to get control of the national police
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    Spain used this stamp issue to try to show respect for the professionalism of the then three branches of the national police. By professionalism, crime fighting was not on the agenda, they meant serving loyally left governments as well as right. It didn’t work and two of the branches were disbanded, just like Franco had done in 1939. So slip on your smoking jacket, fill your pipe, take your first sip of your adult beverage, and sit back in your most comfortable chair. Welcome to todays offering from The Philatelist.… Read more »