Gangwon-do Education Revenue Stamps

The more you search in (online) Korean archives, the more you will find of course. Here is a discovery from the (Korean) Law Archive regarding education revenue stamps from the Provincial Office of Education (POE) of Gangwon-do (강원도교육청). These stamps were in use from the mid-1990s until 1 January 2013, when they were phased out. 

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Korean “digital revenue stamps”

(Text originally published in MSS Quarterly Bulletin Nr. 316.) On 1 January 2017 the last “paper” revenue stamps of the Republic of Korea (“South Korea”) were phased out. Except for the consular revenue stamps used outside of Korea the only type of revenue stamp now in use within the borders of Korea are meter marks.  Meter […]

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Daegu: resident registration card (1976)

All Koreans are registered in their family register which is also used to give details through the type of document shown here. This is called a 주민등록표 (resident registration card). These documents come in several different forms, the more detailed one is this large form. It is somewhat larger than A4 and printed on very thin […]

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Last series of Korean national revenue stamps (2005-2017)

The last series of Korean revenue stamps to be issued for the whole of Korea was this series of 10 revenue stamps. They were printed by KOMSCO, the official government printing company which also prints Korean banknotes and postal stamps. The series was according to the official KOMSCO website put into circulation in 2005. They […]

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Ganghwa-gun: certified document with local stamp (1974)

A more mysterious document is this document from 강화군 (Ganghwa-gun). It is a certified document, written mainly in hanja. Unfortunately the handwriting is very difficult to read, even Koreans I asked couldn’t make much sense of it. The document comes with one local revenue stamp, issued by Ganghwa-gun itself.

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Certified Cadastral Document (1976)

Cadastral documents were produced in large numbers in Korea. Certifications of these documents, named 토지대장등본, were paid for with both national government of Korea revenue stamps and local revenue stamps. This is an example certified by 강화군 (Ganghwa-gun), a local body, but paid for with national revenue stamps. The document cost a total of 40 won, paid […]

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