Stations of the cross, life size

August 19, 2010 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Jeju, Korea 

If you are a catholic of a certain age or older you will remember doing “stations of the cross”, a thing you can still find in every catholic church, but which is not so often practiced any longer. It should to be so that all these catholic acts were very popular, like (endless, if I have to believe it) rosaries, almost daily mass attendance and at least one member of the family a member of the clergy or living in a monastery.

Those days are long gone, but in some parts of the world the Roman Catholic church is still growing, or at least it hasn’t lost most of its appeal. Mass attendance is still relatively high, much higher than in (Western) Europe, and children born into catholic families still become Catholics themselves, even joining monasteries. Even on a small island like Jeju, which has a checkered history when it comes to Catholicism (see here: http://jejulife.net/2009/04/08/the-hwang-sa-byeong-catholic-cemetery-1901-lee-jae-soo-uprising/ why), is quite catholic. When I visited in 2008 I saw (young!) sisters and quite an interesting catholic life.

One of the most interesting things I saw was this station of the cross. I was there, in the southern corner of the island, near I think Suryong, where there is this life size stations of the cross. Even during the middle of the week, in April while it had been raining hard earlier in the day, there were several families actively walking the stations of the cross, singing very catholic songs. I could recognize them, even though the families were singing in Korean, because they were very standard catholic songs, like anyone who is over a certain age can readily sing along.

Anyway, these are the pictures of the largest size stations of the cross I have ever seen:

stations-of-the-cross-jeju-1

Jesus falls under the weight of the cross

Stations of the cross

Everybody standing by the cross

Oh my God why (etc etc)

Oh my God why (etc etc)

Jesus is taken of the cross

Jesus is taken of the cross

Mourning

Mourning

The Dead Sea? Or Lake Tiber?

Lourdes cave

Lourdes cave

I wash my hands...

I wash my hands…

The NVBS cartography section

August 3, 2010 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Railways 

If you are a fan of railways and cartography, the field of railway cartography must be the best thing there is. And so for many people collecting such maps is a thoroughly addicting hobby! The NVBS Library must therefore be a major Walhalla for anyone who has this hobby, including me.

The NVBS Library has a lot of railway related material in store. I myself are part of a group within the NVBS, the Railatlas Bureau. More information on both the NVBS and Railatlas can be found on the internet, but when I was at Amersfoort Station, the location of NVBS since a few months, I made some pictures to give an idea of the number of maps and the type of material we have.

Have a look at for instance this picture:

Hundreds of maps out there!

Hundreds of maps out there!

Boxes etc. filled with drawings, endless series of them.
A lot of these maps were at one time or another drawn by maps of the NVBS, one of which was accidentally a highly professional Dutch mapmaker (see the Railatlas for these maps). But besides creating our own maps we also collect official maps, as background information in case we need to know about (former) railways and tramways. So, one can also find a lot of other maps.

More maps and more maps

More maps and more maps

I opened a box just randomly and I discovered an almost complete set of Finland in detailed maps, dated 1946! Only one out of a set of 8 was missing. And I am pretty sure it must be somewhere else (or it had no railway on it of course…).

Customs house Enschede

Customs house Enschede

Have a look at this picture: if you desperately want to rebuild a former custom’s house at Enschede, look no further, here is the drawing! The read stamp at the bottom of the drawing actually says “demolished” in Dutch, but we still have the drawings.

The NVBS has even more drawings: open any drawer and you will find dozens of maps. Or open any of the tubes on top of the drawers: maps. Hundreds and hundreds of them, some dating back well into the 19th century. Especially the blue maps are valuable: they are originals. There are even (almost) complete sets of original drawings of tramway lines long dismantled.

So, if you happen to look for railway related maps of the Netherlands, look no further than this. That includes maps of the former Dutch colonies, especially the East Indies!

Drawers each filled with drawings

Drawers each filled with drawings

Just open any drawer. Any...

Just open any drawer. Any…

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